OPTOMAP VIDEO

Benefits of the Optomap Retina Imaging

optomap RETINA SCAN

Optomap Ultra Wide Digital Retinal Imaging

 The optomap image is fast, painless and comfortable. It allows a 200 degree view of the retina in one image, versus a normal exam giving the eye doctor a view of 45 degrees at a time. We aim to take optomap images at your Annual Eye Exam every year for early detection of eye diseases .


This panoramic image of your retina allows improved diagnosis and detection of many eye diseases including macular degeneration, retinal detachments and diabetic retinopathy.  Early detection means early intervention and more successful treatment. 



Is it covered by insurance?
Most insurance companies set a low co pay price for the screening of retinal images taken during a routine eye exam. If the images are taken during a special testing appointment or have been deemed medically necessary, however, the price of the images will be billed to your medical insurance and the amount you would be responsible for would depend on your insurance plan and deductible amount.

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Haag-Streit octopus 900: Perimetry you can trust

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What is a Visual Field Test?

  • This is a non-invasive, computerized procedure testing the peripheral vision 
  • Takes about 15 minutes to complete, and is covered by most insurance programs and Medicare. 

What is the purpose of this test?

  • Visual field testing is one way your eye doctor to measures how much vision you have in either eye, and how much periheral vision loss may have occurred over time. 
  • A visual field test can determine if you have blind spots (called scotoma) in your vision and where they are
  • Peripheral vision testing is important to detect problems associated with the eye, optic nerve and brain.

For What Eye Conditions do we need this testing?

  • for Glaucoma 
  • for Blepharoplasty eyelid surgery
  • for Plaquenil Examination
  • for Macula Degeneration
  • for Headaches
  • for Ocular Migraines
  • for Headaches
  • for Sudden vision loss 
  • for MS

zeiss Optical Coherence Tomography

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Optical coherence tomography (OCT)

  • Optical coherence tomography (OCT) is a non-invasive imaging test. OCT uses light waves to take cross-section pictures of your retina. 


  • The Testing is a non-invasive procedure, takes about 15 minutes to complete, and is covered by most insurance programs and Medicare. 


For What Eye Conditions do we need this testing?

  • OCT for Glaucoma 
  • OCT for Diabetic Care
  • OCT for Plaquenil Exam
  • OCT for Macula Deneration & Macula Diseases
  • OCT for Retinal Disease

THE KEY BENEFITS OF OCT


Live sub-surface images at near-microscopic resolution

  • Instant, direct imaging of tissue morphology
  • No preparation of the sample or subject
  • No ionizing radiation


  • Optical Coherence Tomography, or ‘OCT’, is a technique for obtaining sub-surface images of translucent or opaque materials at a resolution equivalent to a low-power microscope. It is effectively ‘optical ultrasound’, imaging reflections from within tissue to provide cross-sectional images.

  • Within the range of noninvasive three-dimensional imaging techniques that have been introduced to the medical research community, OCT as an echo technique is similar to ultrasound imaging. Other medical imaging techniques such as computerized axial tomography, magnetic resonance imaging, or positron emission tomography do not utilize the echo-location principle.


  • The technique is limited to imaging 1 to 2 mm below the surface in biological tissue, because at greater depths the proportion of light that escapes without scattering is too small to be detected. No special preparation of a biological specimen is required, and images can be obtained ‘non-contact’ or through a transparent window or membrane. It is also important to note that the laser output from the instruments is low – eye-safe near-infra-red light is used – and no damage to the sample is therefore likely.

Electroretinography & Visual Evoked potential

Nova Eyecare is the FIRST center to bring this technology to Alaska!

ERG & VEP

  • Testing is a non-invasive procedure, 
  • Takes about 15 minutes to complete
  • And is covered by most  medical insurance and Medicare. 
  •  Please note ERG & VEP  must be  performed on  separate visits 


For What Eye Conditions do we need this testing?

  • for Glaucoma Suspect Evaluation
  • for Macula Degeneration
  • for Retinal Disease
  • for Neurological Care
  • for MS
  • for Diabetic Retinopathy


What is VEP & ERG?

  • Diopsys® Light Induced Visual-response (LIV)™ tests are painless, non-invasive, and provide your doctor with comprehensive information on the function of your vision.
  • Like an electrocardiogram (EKG) which tests heart function, LIV tests work by evaluating how the cells within your vision system are functioning. Eye disease disrupts that function as cells become unhealthy. By catching this dysfunction before the cells die, your doctor may be able to prescribe treatment to make the cells healthy again. Additionally, your doctor can use the tests to help determine if your treatment is working.
  • Visual electrophysiology, including electroretinography (ERG) and visual evoked potential (VEP), is the technology behind Diopsys® Vision Testing Systems. The different ERG and VEP test results assist in better planning your treatment (if any) and monitoring your visual function.

Pattern Electroretinography (ERG) Vision Testing

  • Pattern electroretinography (pattern ERG) is a highly-advanced vision test that objectively measures how well your vision system is working. Information from this test will help your doctor diagnose various vision disorders, as well as better understand when changes in your visual function occur.


What is a pattern ERG vision test?

  • The Diopsys® PERG vision test is a painless, safe, non-invasive way for your eye care provider to objectively measure the function of your retina – the light-sensitive layer at the back of your eye.
  • When light from an image enters your eye, it is turned into electrical energy by cells in the retina. Pattern ERG, or electroretinography, uses visual stimuli from a computer screen in different patterns and contrasts to elicit that electrical response. The electrical energy created is measured by the Diopsys® PERG vision test, and used to create a report for your doctor. It is similar to an EKG, but for your eyes.


How do I prepare for a pattern ERG test?

  • Your face should be clean, dry, and free of any gels, sprays, oils, makeup, or lotion.


How is the Diopsys® PERG vision test done?

  • A technician will clean and dry the skin under your eyes and on your forehead, and then place sensory pads on the recently cleansed areas.
  • The technician will then ask you to cover one eye at a time while the test is being run.
  • Once the test begins, you will see black and white patterns that appear to “flip” quickly over and over again on a computer screen. You will be asked to focus on the pattern during the test. The computer will record your eyes’ response to the images and produce a report for your doctor.

Diopsys® VEP Visual Evoked Potential Vision Test

Visual Evoked Potential (VEP) Vision Testing

  • Visual evoked potential (VEP) is a highly-advanced vision test that objectively measures how well your entire vision system is working. The results of this VEP vision test will help your doctor diagnose various vision disorders, and better understand when changes in your visual function occur.


What is a visual evoked potential (VEP) vision test?

  • The Diopsys® VEP vision test is a painless, safe, non-invasive way for your eye care provider to objectively measure the function of your entire vision system.
  • When light from an image enters your eye, it is turned into electrical energy by cells in the retina – the light-sensitive layer at the back of your eye. These cells send the electrical energy back to the visual cortex, the part of your brain where the image is processed.
  • VEP, or Visual Evoked Potential, uses visual stimuli from a computer screen in different patterns and contrasts to elicit the electrical response from your retina. The electrical energy is then sent to your visual cortex, where the Diopsys® VEP vision test records the electrical signal, and creates a report for your doctor. It is similar to an EKG, but for your entire vision system.


How do I prepare for the VEP test?

  • Your face and hair should be clean, dry, and free of any gels, sprays, oils, makeup, or lotion.

Diopsys® full field electroretinography (ffERG)

What is a full field electroretinography (ffERG) vision test?

  • The Diopsys® ffERG vision test is a painless, safe, non-invasive way for your eye care provider to objectively measure the function of cells in your retina – the light-sensitive layer at the back of your eye.
  • When light from an image enters your eye, it is turned into electrical energy by cells in the retina. The ffERG vision test, sometimes referred to as flash ERG or flicker ERG, uses flashes of light as a visual stimulus to elicit an electrical response from those cells. 
  • The electrical energy created is measured by the Diopsys® ffERG vision test, and used to create a report for your doctor. It is similar to an EKG, but for your eyes.


How do I prepare for an ffERG test?

  • Your face should be clean, dry, and free of any gels, sprays, oils, or lotion.

Pachymetry

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Corneal Pachymetry

  • Pachymetry is a simple, painless test that quickly measures the thickness of the cornea. 


Why Measure Corneal Thickness?

Corneal thickness as measured by pachymetry is important in the eye care field for several reasons.


  • Pachymetry can tell doctors if the cornea is swollen. 
  • Medical conditions such as Fuch's Dystrophy can increase fluid in the cornea and cause an increase in overall thickness. Even wearing contact lenses can sometimes cause significant corneal swelling. This may be difficult to see under the microscope.  However, pachymetry will show a definite increase in thickness


  • Corneal thickness is extremely important in refractive surgical procedures such as LASIK. Knowledge of corneal thickness is important to determine if a person is a candidate for laser vision correction. Because part of the procedure includes removing tissue which will leave the corneal thinner, it is important to know exactly how much will remain. Some people may have a cornea that is just much thinner than normal. It does not cause problems or disease, but it could spell tragic vision loss if a refractive procedure is performed on someone whose cornea is extremely thin.


  • Pachymetry has also become important in glaucoma care. Glaucoma is a disease in which eye pressure (intraocular pressure)can be elevated. Elevated eye pressure can cause nerve fiber loss in the retina which may result in blindness or decreased vision. Most methods involve a method of measuring eye pressure in which the instrument touches the cornea. 


  • Researchers discovered that corneal thickness can vary slightly in the population. Corneal thickness can influence the actual reading of the amount of pressure in the eye. Furthermore, the identification of central corneal thickness as an independent indicator of glaucoma risk by the Ocular Hypertensive Treatment Study (OHTS) has made corneal pachymetry an important part of glaucoma testing.


How Pachymetry Is Performed

Pachymetry can be performed by two methods, by ultrasound techniques or by optical techniques. 

  • Ultrasound Pachymetry: Ultrasound pachymetry as the name implies, uses ultrasound principles to measure the thickness of the cornea. This method uses devices that are cost-effective and portable. The biggest drawback to measuring corneal thickness by ultrasound is that the probe used to touch the cornea has to be position perfectly. Any slight displacement and the reading may not be accurate. Some ultrasound pachymeters are designed more for glaucoma testing and include built-in risk factor calculators.


  • Optical Pachymetry: Optical pachymeters vary on design. Some optical pachymeters are designed to be mounted onto a biomicroscope that eye doctors use called the slit lamp. Other devices can measure pachymetry using specular microscopy. This device does not come into direct contact with the cornea. One type of optical pachymetry that has gained in popularity is OCT or optical coherence tomography pachymetry. OCT pachymetry also does not touch the cornea to achieve the measurements.

Source: https://www.verywellhealth.com/understanding-pachymetry-3421820

constrast sensitivity

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Why is it important to have this test done?

  • Contrast sensitivity is your ability to distinguish the foreground from the background. A contrast sensitivity test measures your ability to distinguish between finer and finer increments of light versus dark (contrast). This differs from common visual acuity testing in a routine eye exam, which measures your ability to recognize smaller and smaller letters on a standard eye chart.


  • Contrast sensitivity is a very important measure of visual function, especially in situations of low light, fog or glare, when the contrast between objects and their background often is reduced. Driving at night is an example of an activity that requires good contrast sensitivity for safety.


  • It is important to note that contrast sensitivity is a much more sensitive measure of real world vision.  Even if you have 20/20 visual acuity, you can have eye or health conditions that may diminish your contrast sensitivity and make you feel that you are not seeing well.

Digital Slit Lamp Exam

Digital imaging systems are used to view and capture high quality contrast images of the surface of your eyes. Utilizing the newest Topcon Premier Photo Slit Lamp SL-D 7 our doctors can properly manage and identify problems on the front surface of your eye. Some common conditions include viral infections, corneal foreign bodies, and corneal ulcers, which can be digitally documented in your records using our digital slit lamp.

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ICare

The Icare® ic100 is an alternative to the "air puff test". It measures the pressure in your eyes that can indicate glaucoma. It is based on a rebound measuring principle that requires no drops, air or specialized skills for its use. This device uses patented rebound technology to measure intraocular pressure.  Its light-weight probe makes momentary contact with the cornea.​ Majority of patients do very well with this version of the test and many report barely feeling the test at all! Icare is included in your Annual Eye Exam at no extra cost.  

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Kowa digital retinal imaging

Similar to the opto​map, the Kowa Digital Retinal Photo gives a wider field of view of the retina than a traditional eye exam. The Kowa Digital Retinal Photo, however,  gives us a more detailed image of specific parts of your eyes, focusing on the macula and optic nerve. 


We use the photos to detect things like macular degeneration and damage to the optic nerve from glaucoma. These photos are not typically a part of your normal eye exam unless our doctors determine that a closer look at specific parts of your retina are necessary. They are more likely to be taken during special testing appointments.


Is it covered by insurance?
Retinal images are not typically covered by vision insurance. The Kowa photos are covered by most medical insurance policies, however, depending on your policy and deductible amount much like the optomap.